Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Vegetable Of The Week - Radish

Vegetable History: 
The descriptive Greek name of the genus Raphanus means "quickly appearing" and refers to the rapid germination of these plants. Raphanistrum, from the same Greek root, is an old name once used for this genus. The common name "radish" is derived from Latin radix (root).

Although the radish was a well-established crop in Hellenistic and Roman times, which leads to the assumption that it was brought into cultivation at an earlier time, Zohary and Hopf note that "there are almost no archeological records available "to help determine its earlier history and domestication. Wild forms of the radish and its relatives the mustards and turnip can be found over west Asia and Europe, suggesting that their domestication took place somewhere in that area. However Zohary and Hopf conclude, "Suggestions as to the origins of these plants are necessarily based on linguistic considerations. - Domestication of plants in the Old World

Vegetable Benefits: 
Fresh Radishes are rich in vitamin C which provide about 15 mg or 25% of DRI of vitamin C per 100 g.  Vitamin C is a powerful water soluble anti-oxidant required by the body for synthesis of collagen. Vitamin C helps body scavenge harmful free radicals, prevention from cancers, inflammation and helps boost immunity. - Nutrition & You 

Radishes are a low calorie vegetable that have no fat or cholesterol. With very little sodium and no protein, radish nutrition facts reveal that the major nutrient contained in ½ cup of radishes is dietary fiber. With 2 grams of carbohydrates. - Fat Burning Furnace

While the fiber in the radish helps fight colon cancer, the vegetable also contains a group of compounds called isothiocyanates, which are shown to be effective against other cancer cell lines. Researchers at Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University in India tested various parts of the radish plant against human cancer cells. The results of their study, published in the September 2010 issue of "Plant Foods For Human Nutrition," show that the compounds in the radish bulb, or root, affect genetic pathways in the cancer cells, inducing cancer cell death. - Livestrong

They contain many phytochemicals like indoles which are detoxifying agents and zeaxanthin, lutein and beta carotene which are flavonoid antioxidants. - Nutrition & You

Radishes are very filling, i.e. fills your stomach and satisfies your hunger easily without giving you many calories, as they are low in digestible carbohydrates, high in roughage and contain a lot of water. It is a very good dietary option for those determined to lose weight. - Organic Facts

Radish helps to relieve congestion within the respiratory system, making it an excellent food for asthmatics and those who suffer from bronchial infections and sinus problems. It is beneficial for both the gallbladder and liver functions, as it acts as a cleanser. - Natural News

Radishes also offer a very good source of the trace mineral molybdenum and are a good source of potassium and folic acid. - Every Nutrient

Being diurectic, cleanser and disinfectant, it helps cure many kidney disorders. Its diurectic properties help wash away the toxins accumulated in the kidneys. Cleansing properties clean kidneys up and lessens accumulation of toxins in the blood, thereby decreasing their concentration in the kidneys. Its disinfectant properties protect the kidneys from any infections too. Thus it is good for overall health of the kidneys. - Organic Facts

No comments:

Post a Comment